Puppy Weight Chart Is Only One Way To Estimate Weight

A puppy weight chart can give you a general idea of your puppy’s growth rate, however, it does not give you specific information for your puppy if you have a mixed breed.  If you have a purebred puppy then you will already have a very accurate idea of the weight and size your puppy will grow to at adulthood as purebreds grow to the same general size each time without any wide variations so you do not really need a puppy weight chart to get this information.


* There are a variety of ways to estimate how much your puppy will weigh once full grown, however, it is not an exact science so sometimes you can end up with a puppy that is not the size you were expecting when you are dealing with mixed breeds.


* Large dog breeds generally take longer to grow to their full adult weight than smaller dog breeds. 


* Every puppy is different so the growth rate varies between puppies just like people grow at different rates.  As long as your puppy is eating a nutritious, healthy diet and is gaining weight then you do not need to have any concerns in regards to your puppy’s growth rate.


* Toy and small dog breeds grow the most between birth and 11 weeks of age and are usually full grown at around 10 - 12 months old.


* Medium, large and giant dog breeds grow the most between birth and 6 months of age and are usually full grown around 1 ½ - 2 years old.


*Your puppy will grow to his full height before he grows to his full weight.


How To Calculate Your Puppy’s Estimated Adult Weight For “Purebred” Puppies Not Using A Puppy Weight Chart:

If your puppy is a purebred and female then she will generally weigh about the same amount as her mother and a male puppy will weigh about the same amount as the father as purebred dogs will grow close to the same weight at adulthood each time without any big variations.


How To Calculate Your Puppy’s Estimated Adult Weight For “Mixed Breeds”Not Using A Puppy Weight Chart:

* Mixed breed puppies do not always grow to a general adult weight so a puppy weight chart does not really work for them because the weights and sizes can vary widely...

For example, you can have a puppy that is one medium breed and one large breed.  In this case, you do not know if your puppy will grow to the medium breed size or the large size or somewhere in between. 


* Use can use the below guidelines to get a close estimate of what weight your puppy will end up as when they reach adulthood:

For a Toy or Small pup, take your puppy’s weight at 6 weeks and double it then double this number.  For example, 1.5 lbs at 6 weeks doubled would be 3lbs then double this for a total of 6lbs which will be your estimated weight of your puppy at adulthood.


For a Medium or Large pup, take your puppy’s weight at 12 weeks and multiply it by 2 then add ½ of the 12 week weight amount .  For example, 20 lbs at 12 weeks multiplied by 2 = 40lbs then take ½ of the 12 week weight which would be 10 lbs and add this to the 40lbs for a total of 50lbs at adulthood as an estimate.


For a Giant pup, take your puppy’s weight at 6 months and double this to get the estimated adult weight.  For example, 60lbs at 6 months x 2 = 120lbs will be the estimated adult weight for your pup.


Therefore, a puppy weight chart does not work that well for a variety of dogs because purebred puppies you can have a very accurate idea already what weight and size your pup will grow to as adults as this does not vary much at all.  Mixed breed puppies can grow to a variety of weights and sizes so the puppy’s weight needs to be calculated in a different manner as you cannot accurately create a chart for this.

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